Petanque best practices for playing with Covid-19

A list of best practices for playing during the pandemic, gathered from various sources.

Current research indicates that Covid-19 is spread primarily by water droplets and aerosolized virus particles exhaled by persons who don’t (yet) realize that they have contracted the disease. We have two tools to stop this mode of transmission— social distancing and mask-wearing. Touching objects or surfaces does not appear to be a significant mode of transmission, although objects should be handled with care and hand-washing after handling objects is recommended.

On the basis of this information, petanque groups have developed some best practices for playing petanque during the Covid-19 pandemic.

  1. Always wear a mask.
     
  2. Practice social distancing. The recommended minimum social distance is 6 feet (2 meters), but make it more if you can.
     
    • Remember to maintain social distancing while boules are being measured. Don’t congregate around the jack while boules are being measured.
       
    • Remember to maintain social distancing while boules are being picked up. Don’t congregate around the jack. Kick boules away from the head, and/or take turns picking up the boules.
       
  3. Don’t share objects or pass them hand-to-hand. This includes hand sanitizer, boules, the jack, the circle, and the tape measure.
     
    • Each game should have its own circle, and there should be a single player who acts as the designated circle-handler. Only he/she should pick up and place and mark the circle. Alternatively, the game may be played without a plastic circle; players draw circles on the ground in the traditional way.
       
    • Each game should have its own tape measure, and there should be a single player who acts as the designated measurement-maker.
       
    • Each team should have its own jack, and there should be a single player who acts as its designated jack-handler. Only he/she should pick up the team’s jack at the end of a mène, and only he/she should throw the team’s jack at the beginning of a mène.
       
  4. Physically space out games, so that there is as much distance as possible between games. If you are playing in a boulodrome with marked lanes, leave at least one unused lane between lanes that are being used.
     
  5. Do not use handshakes (or if you’re French, hugs and kisses) to greet or congratulate each other at the beginning and end of games. Suggested alternatives are verbal greetings, elbow-bumps, or namasté.